Daytime wetting enquiries crop up on our helpline every day. Our helpline advisors have written their answers to the most frequently asked questions.

1. How much should my child drink during the day, especially in school?

Your child should drink at least 6-8 glasses of water-based drinks every day. The size of the glass should be relative to your child’s age and size: about 200ml for a seven year old and 250ml for an 11 year old.

2. Why does my daughter wee so often? She seems to wee more than she drinks!

If your daughter struggles to drink enough and her bladder gets used to being small, it will tell her she needs to wee more frequently. Concentrated wee can also irritate the lining of the bladder, making her want to urinate more often.

3. How can I get my son to drink more?

Gradually build up your son’s water intake by encouraging him to drink little and often. Make sure he finishes the whole glass. Increasing the amount he drinks will make his bladder get used to being stretched. Spread drinks out during the day so his bladder gets lots of regular exercise.

4. What type of drink is best?

Water is best, but well diluted fruit juice or squash are OK. Definitely avoid caffeine, hot chocolate, cola and energy drinks. Milk is fine in moderation but don’t include this in your water intake calculation. Reduce fizzy drinks, blackcurrant, orange and drinks with artificial colourings and sweeteners; see if certain drinks make the wetting worse than others.

5. My son stands up to wee. Should he sit down?

It’s very common for boys do a quick wee standing up and dash out of the toilet again without fully emptying their bladder. Sometimes a small amount of wee left in the bladder can cause a urinary tract infection (UTI). Encourage both boys and girls to empty everything out of their bladder before they finish. Doing a deep sigh will relax them and help the bladder to empty properly.

Standing up to do some wees is OK. Try drawing a happy face on a table tennis ball and leave it floating in the toilet, then get your son to aim his wee at the target. This can help to promote a good stream of wee.

6. Should I get a special toilet seat?

Make sure your child is sitting comfortably and their feet are flat and firmly supported on a stool. A toilet seat might help them to sit in the proper position and to feel relaxed and secure.

7. How many times should my child wee during the daytime?

Children usually need to empty their bladders four to seven times a day. They need to learn to recognise the signals that their bladders give them that they need to empty.

8. Is it a good idea for my daughter to hold on to her wee?

No, she shouldn’t wait too long between wees or the muscles will do too much stretching and not enough squeezing! The bladder needs to be filled fully so that it stretches and gives good, strong signals when it needs to be emptied. It might help to use a vibrating watch in the daytime which will remind your daughter to empty her bladder – see the range of watches in our shop.

9. Why can constipation cause daytime wetting?

The bladder and bowel are very close together. When the bowel has lots of poo stuck in it, the bladder can get pushed to the side which reduces the amount of space to store wee and makes it harder to empty fully.

10. My son dribbles wee all day at school. He’s not bothered by it, but is very wet by the time I pick him up. What should I do?

Remember that for younger children, going for a wee isn’t at the top of their list of things to do! If your son is busy playing, he’ll probably ignore the signals to wee until it’s too late. Use easy-to-achieve rewards to motivate him to get better at going to the loo when his bladder tells him to.

Meanwhile, check for constipation and make sure your son is drinking well. Avoid caffeinated drinks which might irritate his bladder.

11. Should I put my daughter back in nappies?

Returning to nappies isn’t always the best solution. You could try washable absorbent pants or disposable pads, which are available in our shop.