To coincide with the launch of ERIC’s constipation awareness campaign ‘Let’s Talk About Poo’, TV presenter and campaign supporter Dr Ranj Singh will take part in a live Q&A about children’s poo problems and other continence issues on Thursday 16th April at 1pm.

As parents, tackling the subject of poo and identifying whether there is a problem with a child’s pooing habits can be difficult. And it’s not just pooing that can be problematic, other continence issues such as daytime and night-time wetting are also a problem for many children and can in fact be related to bowel problems.

The show will dispel the myths about constipation and other continence problems, everything from warning signs to look out for, how to deal with re-occurring problems, what treatments are available, and where to go for specialist help.

Dr Ranj will be accompanied by the mum of a four year old boy with constipation. Amy Attril will speak about her experience of managing her son Kane’s chronic constipation and will share some of the advice she’s learned.

Whatever the reason for a child’s poo problem, whether it’s because they are finding it difficult to adapt to challenging situations such as starting school or they don’t like using strange toilets, Dr Ranj will provide help, encouragement and advice to handle a child’s poo problem.

Parents of young children in the age group most prone to developing poo problems (2-4 year olds) are invited to submit questions to the show to be answered by Dr Ranj. Health and education professionals working with this age group are also invited to submit questions. 

Dr Ranj is the co-creator and presenter of the CBeebies' show ‘Get Well Soon’, and presenter of the kids' health segment on ITV’s This Morning, he’s also the only TV doctor who specialises in children, young people and families and is the face of ERIC’s ‘Let’s Talk
About Poo’ campaign.

ERIC’s ‘Let’s Talk About Poo’ campaign aims to raise awareness of childhood constipation to ensure it is recognised early and treated at the earliest possible opportunity to avoid it having a long-term impact on children’s health and wellbeing. Find out more about the campaign here.